Category Archives: STEM

Active Alevins!

Our salmon eggs are now very active alevins. Notice their large egg sacs attached to their undersides that provide nutrients until they can feed on their own in the wild. It will be fun to see their development after Thanksgiving break!

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The Salmon are Hatching!

Ewing Young Outdoor Experience Day 2

The classes at our outdoor site were rich in learning and creativity today! Today’s menu was water testing, hydrology, macro invertebrates, and linoleum block printing. Through all the water studies our students engaged in, we learned a lot in regard to our question,  “is Chehalem Creek  a suitable release site for chinook salmon eggs, and would it support spawning chinook salmon.”

A huge thanks to Joel and Roxy Thomas for their amazing work in organizing such a great experience. Our instructors Clair, Dave, Froggy, and Pete were amazing, as well as the several Newberg High School Volunteers! Lastly, thank you parent chaperones for your help with classes and with our students in making smooth transitions throughout each day.

 

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Ewing Young Outdoor Experience Day 1

Aside from a few rain squalls, the weather cooperated for the most part. Our students engaged in some great learning about salmon anatomy, salmon survival, rotten log food webs, and riparian zones. Four new great learning stations tomorrow!

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Salmon Time!

It’s an even-numbered year, which means we raise salmon this time around. A big shout out goes to Mr. Segundo for helping get our incubators and chillers out of storage for us and fetching 90 gallons of water from the well. We picked up our salmon eggs yesterday from the ODFW office in Clackamas, and they are resting comfortably in each of our three classroom incubators.

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Diving Deep in Science and Engineering Practices

In the month of September and part of October, our students engaged in activities and projects that focused on the practices of Planning and Carrying out Investigations, Constructing Explanations and Designing Solutions, and Interpreting and Analyzing Data. Vernier temperature probes were used in investigations and projects such as exploring temperature in a chemical reaction, constructing and testing solar ovens, and designing and testing an insulated cup.

Earning Robotics Driver’s License

Our students are off and running with the new EV3 Robotics kits. Students are working in groups of three. The 5 C’s of Critical Thinking, Collaboration, Communication, Creativity, and Citizenship form a foundation of our program. Mathematics skills and concepts involving graphing, geometry, measurement, and  statistics are embedded continuously as they solve tasks to learn necessary programming skills needed for meeting more complex challenges. When they master the initial set of tasks, they earn their EV3 Robotics Driver’s Licenses. Student engagement has been high and there’s more fun ahead.

Portland Bridge Tour

Walking Portland Bridge Tour today: Our tour guide, Nathan Hoover (www.pdxbridgetours.com), took us from ODOT to the Burnside Bridge, Steel Bridge, Vera Katz Esplanade (a floating walkway), & Union Station for lunch. Next, our buses took us up to the OHSU tram which we rode, then he led us across the new Tilikum Crossing bridge. Altogether it was somewhere between 5-7 miles of walking. The students loved it, and should sleep well tonight

Thank you, EYST!

A big THANK YOU goes out to Parent Club (EYST) for fully funding new EV3 robotics kits. We now have the most up-to-date kit versions that will keep our program running for several more years. Today they were unpacked and labeled. Tomorrow they will be in the hands of our students. Thank you to all, too, who donated time, effort, and funding to our Bingo/ Auction NightEarlier this month to make this purchase possible.

Engineering Design Process

Students took 14 steps that are part of the Engineering Design Process and worked in trios to organize them. Most groups thought linearly but one group showed it as a cycle. The discussions about WHY to place steps in certain places were rich! (There is not a correct answer to this. Some steps–such as Research–could logically occur at several times during the process.)